Sunday sermon 22 June – We are worth more than many sparrows!

Readings: Matthew 10:24-39

Sermon

“A student is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his master. It is enough for the student to be like his teacher, and the servant like his master. If the head of the house has been called Beelzebub, how much more the members of his household!” (Matthew 10:24-25)

I’ve had all kinds of people get fed up with me over the years. Including one man who said I was a Satan worshipper. It turns out that he believed this to be true because I led worship with a guitar. Mind you I’m in good company. They called Jesus Beelzebub – Lord of the flies – one of Satan’s titles.

There are aspects of Jesus’ calling in the gospel reading today that are radical and disconcerting. Especially if you’re in it for a comfortable ride.

So what is the context of these interesting sayings?

Matthew chapter 10 at the beginning is all about the twelve being sent out on a Mission – remember how Jesus saw the crowds – had compassion on them – because they were harassed and helpless like sheep without a shepherd? Do you remember Jesus (as recorded in Matthew 9:37-38) – how Jesus said “the harvest is plentiful and the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest to send out workers into his harvest field?” You remember this?

Well this is the extension of the story of that Mission. They had gone out and preached the good news that the Kingdom of heaven was near (10:7). They were to heal the sick and raise the dead, cleanse lepers and drive out demons (10:8). And of course shake the dust of their feet when people did not welcome them or listen to their message (10:14). This is the time when he said to them “I am sending you out like sheep before wolves. Therefore be as shrewd as snakes and innocent as doves” (10:16).They would be arrested and flogged (10:17) and brought before Governors and Kings as witnesses to them (10:18).

It was here that that famous and encouraging word was spoken by Jesus – we referred to it at Pentecost: Mat 10:19  But when they arrest you, do not worry about what to say or how to say it. At that time you will be given what to say, Mat 10:20  for it will not be you speaking, but the Spirit of your Father speaking through you.And so families would be in conflict – they would be hated – they would be persecuted and have to flee (10:23).

In the same passage there are references to the future church as well – those who were to go on a similar Mission after his resurrection and ascension. The same dangers applied – and certainly they were to face persecution just as Christians today face persecution.

So it’s in the context of this Mission that we pick up our reading today: Mat 10:24  “A student is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his master. Mat 10:25  It is enough for the student to be like his teacher, and the servant like his master. If the head of the house has been called Beelzebub, how much more the members of his household!

Mat 10:26  “So do not be afraid of them. There is nothing concealed that will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made known. Mat 10:27  What I tell you in the dark, speak in the daylight; what is whispered in your ear, proclaim from the roofs. Mat 10:28  Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather, be afraid of the One who can destroy both soul and body in hell. Mat 10:29  Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from the will of your Father. Mat 10:30  And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Mat 10:31  So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.

So what do we take from this? The “them” inverse 26 is the category of all those who oppose and persecute Christians. This was never going to be an easy ride.

WHAT HELPS US THEN

I think what is helpful is to focus is this basic principal – whatever you go through – don’t be afraid.

For those early followers of Jesus – when people are against you – DON’T BE AFRAID.

Mat 10:26  “So do not be afraid of them. There is nothing concealed that will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made known.

This seems to indicate that the truth will come out eventually. Paul supports this in 1 Corinthians 4:5 – Therefore judge nothing before the appointed time; wait till the Lord comes. He will bring to light what is hidden in darkness and will expose the motives of men’s hearts. At that time each will receive his praise from God.

David Brown in a commentary on Matthew puts it this way: There is no use, and no need, of concealing anything; right and wrong, truth and error, are about to come into open and deadly collision; and the day is coming when all hidden things shall be disclosed, everything seen as it is, and every one have his due.

Jesus continues: Mat 10:28  Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather, be afraid of the One who can destroy both soul and body in hell. Mat 10:31  So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.

One commentator on this passage puts it like this: Jesus’ mission discourse is a “get-out-the-volunteers” campaign like no other. On the one hand, the disciples are granted remarkable powers to heal, exorcise demons, cleanse lepers, even to raise the dead. But he also denies them money, pay, extra clothes, a staff for protection, even sandals. They are to undertake their mission in complete vulnerability and dependence on God (10:8-11), even knowing that they go as “sheep in the midst of wolves,” face arrests and beatings, opposition even from family members, and hatred and persecution (10:16-23).

So what are we afraid of?

Jesus seemed okay in his training to paint the worse-case scenarios. Maybe that was a good training technique.

I love the pictures that he used to illustrate this. I’ve quipped about the one picture before. I think for me God’s task is getting easier each year when it comes to me: Mat 10:30  And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered.

It’s the sparrows that I like. Listen again: Mat 10:29  Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from the will of your Father. Mat 10:31  So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.

A story to illustrate (hopefully).

I was sitting with a friend at the local French Café this week – we share a common kind of ministry and support each other along the way. While we were there – sitting outside in true café style with rain and wind coming and going (I had my training for this in Wellington!) a sparrow came and joined us – sitting on top of one of the chairs at our table.

I told my friend that there had been some controversy at that café because, so they say, the owner had got fed-up with the sparrow and had poisoned them. Not very nice when you consider Matthew 10:29:  Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from the will of your Father.

A worse story is this one. 

It’s a story about a sparrow that somehow got into the rafters of St. Helen’s Parish Church in the English town of Brant Broughton. At the time of the intrusion, they were recording a guitar recital for later broadcast on the radio. The chirping bird didn’t exactly chirp with the beat. So the pastor, Rev. Robin Clark (ironically) asked the congregation to leave and then asked a friend to bring his pellet gun over to the church to shoot the intruding sparrow. The killing of the sparrow became front page news in Great Britain. The London Daily Telegraph ran a clever headline that said, “Rev. Robin Orders Death of Sparrow.”

 Editorials and letters to the editor flowed, chastising the cruel and unusual punishment for this lowly bird. People who  hadn’t darkened the door of a church in decades suddenly remembered Psalm 84 in which it is declared that even sparrows are welcome in the house of the Lord (84:3). By the way – here is Psalm 84:3:  Even the sparrow has found a home, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may have her young— a place near your altar, O LORD Almighty, my King and my God.

Poor Rev Robin. Poor little sparrow. We can easily sentimentalise things.

The comparison of course means we are more valuable than sparrows. And nothing happens to us either that he does not allow or care about – that’s the implication. What it doesn’t say is that the sparrow will be spared – or that we will be spared.

Persecution is at the heart of this. The cost for some people is jail and execution – more in this generation than ever before. And it is a price to pay. And many are not spared. Martyrdom is rife today in many parts of the world.

And yet he still cares.

After the sparrow story comes these lines – the ones that probably get us – have us pinned against the wall: Mat 10:32  “Whoever acknowledges me before men, I will also acknowledge him before my Father in heaven. Mat 10:33  But whoever disowns me before men, I will disown him before my Father in heaven.

We’ve institutionalised this in our churches – in public profession of faith with baptism that formalises our membership of the church. And if people were baptised and made a public profession of faith in another congregation our Session can resolve to admit them to membership of this one.

The context of Matthew 10 is different though. It’s an acknowledgement in the face of risk. Is a pubic admission that we follow Jesus – in society.

It has to mean that we identify ourselves out there in our daily lives.

And then the rest of the Gospel reading today is in itself is quite challenging: Mat 10:34  “Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword. Mat 10:35  For I have come to turn “‘a man against his father, a daughter against her mother, a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law— Mat 10:36  a man’s enemies will be the members of his own household.’ Mat 10:37  “Anyone who loves his father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves his son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me; Mat 10:38  and anyone who does not take his cross and follow me is not worthy of me. Mat 10:39  Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.

It’s almost as if we are quite disconnected from this early discipleship. It is radical – and requires huge commitment. And Jesus comes first before everyone else. And you have to take up your cross and follow – otherwise you’re not worthy of Jesus. It’s risky – if it’s about you, then you lose. If you surrender your life for Jesus’ sake – you win!

How about us?

  • Do we acknowledge Christ in the rest of our lives (outside of Church life)?
  • Or are we living a double life? Secret Christians?
  • Do we love Him more than all those listed?
  • Are we radical enough?
  • Do we take our crosses and follow Christ? (Admittedly some of us have crosses thrust upon us that we would not choose).
  • Are we worthy of Jesus?

Great questions these! It’s up to us really!

AMEN

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About robinpalmer

I am a Presbyterian Pastor living and working in Browns Bay on the North Shore of Auckland in New Zealand. We moved here at the end of March 2011 after spending five years in Wellington the capital city. I am passionate about what I do - about communicating and writing. I also enjoy my counselling work, especially with young people.

Posted on June 22, 2014, in Sunday Morning Sermons and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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