9 April 2020: Day 15 of lock down – Day 4 of Holy week also known as Maundy Thursday.

Reading for reflection: John 13:1-35

A lot has happened this week. In every sense. Around the world, in our country, in our homes, and hopefully in our hearts. Holy week has taken us on a journey with Christ from Palm Sunday into the temple which he cleansed, back to the temple for his teachings, and that time of waiting once Judas had gone off to negotiate his capture for money.

The Pandemic has dragged millions of people through stress, heartache, anxiety and separation. Nearly 90 000 families have been bereaved, many with little opportunity to mourn and farewell their loved ones in the traditional formal way. Add to this more people heading for poverty and unemployment than we would ever wish for. The prospect of failed businesses.

Each of us here In New Zealand has had to figure out how to manage our “bubbles” in the most non-anxious un-chaotic way. And for people who follow my vocation, it’s Easter. The most significant time of the year in our faith. Busy time indeed.

I lost track of the days yesterday. But I do know that tonight is Maundy Thursday. The night of the institution of the Lord’s Supper. The night in which ceremonial foot washing (I failed to get anyone to let me wash their feet last time I tried) reminds us of Jesus the servant leader. The suffering servant. The dying servant. The one who calls our name at tombs and dead ends (a little preview of Sunday’s message slipping in).

When I think of foot washing I think of much more messy stuff. The nursing and caring staff around the world who deal with bedpans, adult nappies, cleaning us up when in our frailty we become as dependent as new born babies. Suddenly washing feet doesn’t seem so bad.

“Maundy” has its roots in the word for commandment. Jesus gave one new commandment to add to and flavour the rest. Loving your neighbour as yourself always sounds like a kind of quid pro quo. Like the golden rule – do unto others as you would have them do unto you. A nice ethic of reciprocity.

The new commandment is more like the risks that our medical staff around the world live with now. Love one another as Jesus loves us? How did he show his love? Sacrifice. He gives his life for us. So are they.

It’s a bit too close to the bone really, and highlights the agony of a vocation that can kill you and leave your beloved family behind. I don’t know if we can get our heads around that. Clapping for them and cheering them on is good. (Get them the proper PPE stuff please.) Staying at home is better than just cheering and clapping – we do it so that we can kill off the spread of this Covid-19 scourge. Being on our own is not a great sacrifice compared to those who have given their lives for their calling. Given their lives for ordinary people like you and me who become patients through no fault of their own.

Have a lovely Easter weekend at home dear friends.
Be at peace.

We are not alone.

About robinpalmer

I am a Presbyterian Pastor living and working in Browns Bay on the North Shore of Auckland in New Zealand. We moved here at the end of March 2011 after spending five years in Wellington the capital city. I am passionate about what I do - about communicating and writing. Preaching and teaching remains a joy.. More recently I have been doing some part time voluntary prison chaplaincy.

Posted on April 9, 2020, in On line messages and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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